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Human Rights Program
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Human Rights Program

News

  • Director Barbara Frey Speaks to Prospective CLA Students

    As a part of the Sneak Preview program for prospective 2016 freshmen, Human-Rights-Program-Director Barbara Frey presented a seminar engaging students interested in the University of Minnesota's College of Liberal Arts with and introduce them to the study and field of human rights. 

    In a day of campus activities, information sessions, and tours, a group of high school juniors and seniors were able to take a moment and listen to Director Barbara Frey speak on the opportunities on campus and within the community surrounding human rights--as well as its contemporary history. In her seminar, Frey was able to touch on the various opportunities on campus and around the community for students to be involved in the human right discipline: in the Global Studies major, in the Human Rights Program, and in various human rights organizations around the Twin Cities. To provide context to the work being done in human rights, she continued with an outline of the various mechanisms and characteristics of human rights in international law and politics, engaging students with the Universal Declaration of Human Rights booklet, the development of the relationship of human rights between and among state and non-state actors, and the characteristics of classifying "human" rights. To close, the seminar was opened up for discussion, allowing for interested students to connect with others and have any specific questions regarding the program or study and promotion of human rights answered.
    (Continue Reading)
  • Former Student Advisory Board Member Awarded Fulbright Scholarship


    Beginning this summer, Erik Katovich, a former member of the Human Rights Program Student Advisory Board, will begin his work as a Fulbright Scholar in São Paulo, Brazil. Having graduated this past year from the University of Minnesota with a B.S. in economics and minors in mathematics, Spanish, and history, Erik plans to continue to his work in the field of economics, with a focus on development, as both a student and a researcher. 



    As an undergraduate at the University of Minnesota, Erik studied abroad early and extensively. Following his return from his second trip abroad in Spain, he became interested in studying the neighboring language of Portuguese. Do in part to his love for travel and learning languages--combined with his fields of study--Erik was able to develop a deep interest in the rich and complex literature, culture, and history of Brazil. Consequently, Erik became greatly interested in the enormous economic, political, and environmental challenges the country faces as its development enters the 21st Century.

    From his understanding of the field of economics, there are many questions and issues to be raised regarding the balancing of development, growth, and consumption with equality and human rights. On a more practical level, Erik further developed his interest in promoting and studying human rights from his internship experiences working with ESL learners and asylum-seekers and his time living abroad. As such, he has become actively involved in the Human Rights Program Student Advisory Board, serving the program for multiple years. Just this past year he was able to apply his desire in raising awareness of human rights issues and constructing workable solutions to its related issues by taking part in efforts to raise awareness for International Human Rights Day in December and in a clothes drive project for recognition of International Women's Day in March. 
      
    As a way to combine his interest in Brazil and in continuing his travels abroad with an application of his studies, Erik successfully applied for a scholarship through the US federal government's Fulbright Program to take part in a larger ongoing project hosted at the State University of Campinas in Brazil that focuses on comparing the development of labor markets in Brazil and the United States over the past few decades. For his part of the project, Erik will work with household survey and census data to measure the relationship between educational attainment and funding and uneven growth in productivity in various occupations, subsequently leading to changing forms of inequality throughout the economy. With a major policy goal in Brazil of addressing the right to an access to education, this work is inherently pertinent to the field of human rights. The results may demonstrate to policymakers the importance of funding education, or it may reveal the ways in which education policies drive inequality. Nevertheless, it should raise awareness for ways in which lawmakers can refine investment and efforts to better address and reduce inequalities in the country. The project's efforts will be an important contribution to Brazil's national debate over how to navigate the effects of the world economy and development on its citizens’ education and living standards. 

    Through the program, Erik hopes to further hone his approaches to economic research and to further understand the role of the economy--both in Brazil and worldwide--in the field of human rights. As a Fulbright Scholar, he hopes to build connections and communication with activists and students and to deepen his knowledge of other countries, cultures, and languages.

    Following his Scholarship, Erik aims to pursue graduate school for a PhD in applied economics or a related field with the help of his various experiences and interests. We commend Erik on his achievements and contributions, and we look forward to seeing his contributions to the field of human rights and beyond. 

    To learn more about the Fulbright Program, click here



    (Continue Reading)
  • Director Barbara Frey and Professors Robert Stein and David Weissbrodt Receive Center for Victims of Torture Annual Eclipse Awards

    On 23 July 2015, the Center for Victims of Torture published the following article to its website:

    As the Center for Victims of Torture™ (CVT) commemorates its 30th anniversary, the organization presents its annual Eclipse Award to its founders. This group of individuals was instrumental in launching the organization in 1985 and making key contributions to its early growth and development.


    Recipients include Barbara Frey, Samuel Heins, Rudy Perpich, Jr. and the late Minnesota Governor Rudy Perpich, Terry Saario, Robert Sands, Robert Stein, Tom Triplett and David Weissbrodt in recognition of their role in founding and supporting the organization 30 years ago.

     “CVT is proud to recognize these visionary leaders who recognized a gap in the human rights movement: the need for torture survivors to have access to specialized rehabilitative care. Their leadership provided the momentum that established an organization that was the first of its kind in the United States,” said Curt Goering, executive director of CVT. “Repeatedly, these individuals demonstrated a commitment to rebuilding the lives of torture survivors, as well as leadership at the global level in putting an end to torture.”

    CVT presents the Eclipse Award each year near June 26 - International Day in Support of Victims of Torture- to an individual or organization that has played a crucial role in the prevention of torture or rehabilitation of torture survivors. June 26 is the day in 1987 when the United Nations Convention Against Torture and Cruel, Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment went into effect. Events are held around the world to celebrate this special day.

    The honorees...[received] the Eclipse award on June 24 in Washington, D.C. as part of an event recognizing the growth and expansion made by CVT over its 30 years of extending rehabilitative care to torture survivors and advocating to end torture. Recipient biographies are available here. 

     Originally published on the CVT Website.
    (Continue Reading)

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Human Rights Beat

  • Chicago police detain Americans at abuse-laden 'black site'

    The Chicago police department operates an off-the-books interrogation compound, rendering Americans unable to be found by family or attorneys while locked inside what lawyers say is the domestic equivalent of a CIA black site. The facility, a nondescript warehouse on Chicago's west side known as Homan Square, has long been the scene of secretive work by special police units. Interviews with local attorneys and one protester who spent the better part of a day shackled in Homan Square describe operations that deny access to basic constitutional rights. Continue reading on The Guardian's website.

    March 6th, 2015
  • Amnesty International requests letter signing for Syrian asylum seekers pressured to return

    Reports in the media show that staff at the Manus Island, Papua New Guinea detention centre, run by the Australian Government, are pressuring Syrian asylum seekers to return to Syria where they will be in extreme danger. Read more on the Amnesty International website.

    June 10th, 2014
  • The ICRC releases video on Colombian human rights situation

    It's a crucial time for Colombia with presidential elections slated for this Sunday and ongoing peace talks between the government and FARC guerrillas continuing in Havana, Cuba. In a new Intercross video, the head of the ICRC's delegation in Bogotá, Jordi Raich, says Colombia is at a crossroads -- poised on the verge of economic growth, shrinking poverty, and the potential to put an end to half a century of war. Watch the video on the Intercross website.

    May 28th, 2014
  • US: A Nation Behind Bars

    Far too many US laws violate basic principles of justice by requiring disproportionately severe punishment, Human Rights Watch said in a report released today. The 36-page report, "Nation Behind Bars: A Human Rights Solution," notes that laws requiring penalties that are far longer than necessary to meet the purposes of punishment have given the United States the world's highest reported rate of incarceration. These laws have spawned widespread and well-founded public doubts about the fairness of the US criminal justice system. Continue reading on the Human Rights Watch website.

    May 7th, 2014